“20 Good Reasons to be Anti-American”, by Martin Peltier

Book : Martin Peltier, 20 bonnes raisons d’être anti-américain (20 Good Reasons to be Anti-American), éditions Die, June 2015, 210 pages.

Some might object that this is just knee-jerk anti-Americanism. Besides the fact that this description would not bother the author in the slightest, his chapters are in fact packed with specific examples (for instance, on the impact of the Blum-Byrnes agreements on French cinema) and the chapter on the “Control of Images” (a key priority for the US, because this ensures that emotion triumphs over reason) as well as the chapter entitled “The American: from Imperial Communication to the Confusion of Thought” are highly informative.

Equally convincing, because they are all supported by facts from history and current events, are the chapters “America Spies on us and Misinforms the World” (a chapter which examines the fact the Saddam Hussein’s chemical weapons’ arsenal did not exist as well as the recent massacre in Ferguson, a master-stroke of Obamian propaganda, deconstructed with precision in this chapter); “The NGOs – Agents of American Globalism”; and “The Judges, the New Kings of the World”, a chapter that owes a great deal to Eric Delcroix’s masterpiece, “Le Théâtre de Satan” (Satan’s Theatre), which shows the pollution and subversion of Roman and Germanic law by American legalism based on morality, a morality which is selective, biased and circumstantial, even though the First Amendment gives the illusion of complete freedom of expression.

This brings us to the chapter entitled “Against American Morality” and the education policy produced by the American way of thinking: this “education of separation”, currently favoured by our system, aims to “divide the different generations from one another” in order to prevent the natural transmission of cultural values from one generation to the next. The result of this form of education is that “a 60 year-old man is inevitably despised by the Balilla of the anti-racist movements (the “Vallaud Belkacem Youth”) if, despite the onslaught by the mass-media, he has managed to preserve his way of thinking that was given to him by his parents”.  According to the author, this explains the current crisis in the Front National  because “despite being wary, the Marine Le Pen generation is not untainted” by this contamination.

Martin Peltier, who dedicates his book to Marcel Aymé (an allusion to his book “Travelingue”) is not the first author to show the damage of the American way of life and, especially, the American way of thinking. Both the Hungarian Thomas Molnar (professor at the University of Colombia in New York) and Alexander Solzhenitsyn in his famous Harvard Commencement Address have higlighted the dangers of an alignment with the US. This has been condemned more recently by the academic and former Croatian diplomat, Tomislav Sunic, in his book Homo Americanus, a species which exists in infinite varieties from Bangok to Warsaw and which the author describes as being “the child of the postmodern age”.

Martin Peltier’s achievement is to describe the multifaceted nature of the phenomenon and to make a comprehensive assessment of the damage inflicted on our countries and on our relations with “the destitute of the world” (see chapter 8 “America Teaches Us How to Live Together” … by beating us with the big stick marked “feel guilty”, a technique which has proven successful in Germany).

Some will criticise him for his treatment of a highly controversial issue, the subservience of America to Jewish messianism, thus following the footsteps of the ill-fated Pierre-Antoine Cousteau and his book “Jewish America”. Does he not examine the “Jewish origins” of the US and the “Judeo-Masonic and Protestant collusion against Rome”?

But criticising him for this would be to forget that some of the US Founding Fathers were already wary of the “chosen people”. The historian Paul del Perugia, for instance, states in his “Louis XV” (Albatros 1976) that in the preliminary debates on the American Constitution, Benjamin Franklin had asked to prevent the Jews from entering the US. He received little support. If Cleopatra’s nose had been shorter and the voice of Benjamin Franklin had been louder, world history would have been totally changed. And perhaps Martin Peltier would never have embarked on his indictment…

Translated from French

The original author was Camille Galic

Source : Polemia

http://www.polemia.com/20-bonnes-raisons-detre-anti-americain-de-martin-peltier/

 

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